Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Tel: 01462 379879
Mob: 07999 700892

The Decisive First Aid Blog

 

 

 


Take a moment to appreciate your own breathing. It’s amazing. The whole process feels natural and effortless, yet the biology and physics of how we breathe is truly mind-blowing. This blog will focus on pulmonary surfactant, and it’s impact on a drowning situation
 
Pulmonary Surfactant.
Pulmonary surfactant is a naturally occurring chemical that lines the inside walls of our alveoli. Without the surfactant our alveoli would collapse and they would be impossible to reinflate by the natural breathing process. We would quickly suffocate.
 
The drowning victim.
If someone has been in a drowning situation, water may have entered the lungs. If it has got down to some of the alveoli, this extra water will react with the surfactant and create a froth. This is a very bad situation.
 
First Aid treatment for the drowning victim.
The resuscitation protocol for a drowning victim, who is not breathing normally, is to start by giving 5 rescue breaths. If you see froth coming from the patient's mouth, you may find this off-putting and be tempted to do chest compressions only. Don't be put off!

 

ALWAYS GIVE 5 RESCUE BREATHS FOR A DROWNING PATIENT,                ………EVEN IF FROTH IS PRESENT IN THEIR MOUTH.

THIS PERSON NEEDS THE OXYGEN THAT YOU CAN GIVE THEM.



It may be harder to see and feel the chest rise because their surfactant levels are now reduced, but blow steadily and firmly. These 5 rescue breaths must be successful. Once the 5 rescue breaths have been given, continue your resuscitation protocol at 30:2 and ensure that someone is calling 999.
 
Training candidates on First Aid courses to manage a drowning patient.
When I'm training people who work or play by water, I don't go into the biology or physics of pulmonary surfactant. However, when they are practising on the mannequins, the scenarios are developed. I now put froth in the mouth of the mannequin. The candidates have to ignore this and proceed with the correct resuscitation protocol. Without rescue breaths the patient will die.
 
If you work or play by water and would like further information on how I could help you and your team with their First Aid training then please get in touch.
Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Thanks for reading and stay safe.

Did you say Face, Arms, Speech and then got stuck?

 

Knowing the FAST Test is a good start but there’s 10 others to look out for (as documented on the NHS website). I’d like you to read the following account by Andy Mitchell. The words are his own and he’s kindly given me permission to share his story.

As I lay crumpled on the pavement, my breathing had stopped, my heart had stopped beating and soon I would be dead, leaving my shattered family to grieve. What follows is the fantastic true story of how I defied the odds. My name is Andy Richardson, my story is being told by Andrew Barras. Please read to the end.

This article is aimed to assist those that have taken up a role as first aider in the workplace, but it's equally relevant for the home or public setting.
The document highlights what the first aider should check for during the primary and secondary surveys. It's not an exhaustive list but hopefully you'll find it manageable, and the key observations are covered.

There's not enough space to include what actions to take for each abnormal presentation so please refer back to your training or get in touch if you'd like to know more. Feel free to download it and print off. Thanks for reading and stay safe.

 

 

The purpose of this article is to make you consider the process of dealing with a casualty so that you make good decisions.

This blog was inspired from a real event.

An elderly woman had fallen to the pavement. A member of the public called 999 and the call-taker advised that the patient didn’t move. An ambulance would come as soon as possible but the estimated delay for an ambulance was 22 hours!

If you work or play by water, or if you are responsible for those that do, then please read on. The main body of this article is someone’s agonising real-life experience of Leptospirosis.

 

At the end I’ve added links to two documents from the HSE which highlights what employers need to be doing to protect their workforce. The other link is from the NHS highlights the symptoms as well as some do’s and don’t to protect yourself from infection.

Please take care, you don’t want to catch this. If this is contracted through work, then it needs to be reported using RIDDOR.

 

 Leptospirosis, my experience by L.H.

Is your defibrillator missing a vital bit of kit?

Automated External Defibrillators (AED) save lives, as many of us will have seen, or heard, with what happened to football player Christian Eriksen at the Euros 2021.

 

TIME is the critical factor. The chances of surviving an out-of-hospital sudden cardiac arrest are largely dependent on how soon a shock can be delivered. It’s great if there is a defibrillator at your place of work but is it missing a vital bit of kit? ….an AED Preparation Kit.

 

Not all defibrillators have a pouch for an AED Prep Kit. Without an AED Prep Kit you may lose several minutes of time, or even be unable to deliver a shock at all!

 

By having an AED Preparation Kit arrive with the defibrillator, then the delay in delivering a shock is kept to a minimum. It’s imperative that the First Aiders in your team are familiar with your defibrillator and where the AED Prep Kit is located.

 

Let’s look at the contents and how they help keep those delays to a minimum...

When considering Health and Safety in the workplace, it won’t be long before we are considering our First Aid provision and First Aid kits, and what’s in them.

 

“Does our First Aid box meet HSE guidelines?”

 

The HSE guidelines state that all businesses need to have First Aid provision, but that the contents of the First Aid box simply have to be appropriate for the business. The HSE help by giving guidance on what should be in the box, and that help can be found HERE. It’s only guidance, you have to do that First Aid Needs Assessment and decide on what contents you require to meet your needs.

 

Remember that items in a first aid kit do have an expiry date. Adhesive plasters will deteriorate with time and won’t stick. Dressings can deteriorate with time and simply disintegrate.

 

Sterile dressings should packaged with an expiry date clearly visible. If the packaging is found to be damaged, don’t use it. If the expiry date has passed, don’t use it.

This needs more than a plaster!  A guide for the more extreme.

Hi,

In this blog we’ll look at First Aid kits for those working in higher risk occupations or who are involved with outdoor sports, and adventure sports. There are plenty of programmes on TV showing the ambulance service responding to serious injuries; injuries where seconds do count, and if a first aider is going to stop that bleeding, they will need more than a plaster!


Feedback from Previous Attendees

 

  • Really enjoyable and informative course, delivered expertly. Support materials and teaching aids were great. Thanks
  • A great course, really enjoyed it. Many thanks.
  • A great course very safely delivered given the covid restrictions. Still able to think about incidents and be better prepared for what to do if they occur.
  • In depth training
  • Scenarios were very useful and informative, especially the reflective learning.
  • Another great day! Really enjoyed it. Many Thanks.
  • Well run and fun course despite the challenges of running in covid.
  • Strange times with Covid but course was well executed and great use of additional tools to support. 😊
  • Amazing course. I feel much more confident. Amazing trainer. I think this is the first training session I haven’t fallen asleep or even wanted to. Team Andrew 😊
  • Great course. Lots of work and commmitment from Decisive First Aid. Extra miles done for us to enjoy and to like the course. Very motivating.
  • The Instructor Andy was brilliant. He presented himself and course really well.
  • Very good course. Andrew was engaging and it was an interactive course, all done in a covid secure way.
  • Great course/Great Teacher – Would highly recommend.
  • Trainer delivered the course very well, kept us engaged.
  • Very well run – feel the course met my expectations and I feel confident to deal with issues.
  • Andrew explained things very clearly and was enjoyable to listen to. Just the right amount of information for a one day course.
  • Great course, good use of slides and practical exercises.
  • I particularly liked the friendly relaxed attitude.
  • It was interactive with real life examples.
  • I loved the practical method and I love learning more about helping people.
  • I learned new things I am confident will come in handy one day and hopefully be able to help someone should the situation present itself.
  • Really happy with the content we covered.
  • A very good day, enjoyable and informative.
  • Very organised event. Professional
  • Excellent course. Excellent tutor.
  • Very well delivered. Excellent equipment with a chance to try everything. Learning needs met. Thanks
  • Lovely First Aid course
  • Attended Emergency First Aid at Work course with Andrew in Stevenage this was an excellent course, very informative and all practical skills assessed.
  • As a person with dyslexia all possible assistance was given to me without any difficulty.
  • I liked the use of props to demonstrate.
  • Very much informative.
  • I particularly liked how the training linked to our own work environment. Very Interesting and easy to follow.
  • Andrew explained everything clearly and made the whole course interesting throughout.
  • I liked the scenarios.
  • I particularly liked the hands on training
  • Really good course.
  • Very informative. I feel I am prepared as I can be for if such a situation should arise. Fantastic Training.
  • Feel confident that if ever needed to put into practice/real incident, I would be happy to do so.
  • Good course, easy to follow.
  • The bespoke nature of the course and the overall delivery.
  • I particularly liked the experience of the trainer and relating to real life situations.
  • Great course, good use of slides and practical exercises.
  • I particularly liked the friendly relaxed attitude.
  • It was interactive with real life examples.
  • I loved the practical method and I love learning more about helping people.
  • I learned new things I am confident will come in handy one day and hopefully be able to help someone should the situation present itself.
  • Really happy with the content we covered.
  • A very good day, enjoyable and informative.

About
About
Courses
Courses
"Learn
Learn Zone
Contact
Contact Us